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Emergency Management

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For information on the current High River Flows please visit http://www.ses.sa.gov.au/site/community_safety/river_murray_flood_information.jsp

https://www.waterconnect.sa.gov.au/River-Murray/SitePages/2014%20Flow%20Reports.aspx

For information on road closures please visit http://traffic.sa.gov.au/

Effective disaster recovery processes should enable affected communities to become more resilient. The Australian approach to disaster recovery management is based on a philosophy of community empowerment and self-management. However more active involvement and cooperation between communities and disaster management agencies through risk assessment and community development further improves disaster response and recovery capacities. Information and strategies to help residents prepare, prevent and recover from commonly encountered emergencies can be located through the Rural City of Murray Bridge's Community Emergency Management Plan.

Bushfires

Bushfires are an intrinsic part of Australia's environment. Natural ecosystems have evolved with fire and the landscape, along with its biodiversity, has been shaped by both historic and recent fires. Many of Australia's native plants are fire prone and very combustible while numerous species depend on fire to regenerate.

Wide firebreaks along property boundaries must be maintatined and fuel reductions (controlled) burning is carried out during the cooler seasons. The risk of a bushfire occuring can be reduced if people take a little more care and use common sense when dealing with fire or materials that can ignite easily. A carelessly thrown cigarette butt, or a campire not properly extinguished, are just two common causes of fires.

The Country Fire Service would be happy to provide more information about fire safety and prevention.

Planning & Responding To An Emergency

What is an Emergency?

There are some very common aspects to help identify the difference between an emergency and a local incident. The impact of a local incident on those affected can be traumatic, however in the broader sense an emergency will:

* be unpredictable in terms of when they will occur;

* require a coordinated response;

* involve a sense of urgency (to remedy the situation);

* involve danger to life and/or property;

* involve major disruption to normal patterns of life;

* result in a high level of impact on the community; and

* usually involve a number of people.

Emergencies may include floods, major storm, bushfire, heatwaves and earthquakes.  Emergencies are an inherent part of the Australian environment. Whilst we cannot prevent them, we can minimise the risks they pose.

The State Emergency Services (SES) can provide more detail on local hazards.

Recovering From An Emergency

The Rural City of the Murray Bridge will try and return to normal business activity as soon as possible after an emergency event.

The Department For Communities & Social Inclusion (DFC) Emergency Management Program provides advice and practical assistance to help people and communities to recover from major emergencies such as floods, droughts, storms and bushfires. This includes the provision of food, accommodation, financial support information and referral.

The Disaster Assist website lists public information messages, relevant free call numbers, information on Australian Government Assistance Packages offered and links to other relevant websites and information.

Volunteering is another valuable way of contributing to recovery efforts.  For more information on volunteering refer to the DFC or Red Cross websites.

 

Emergency Contacts

SA POLICE         

000 EMERGENCY
131 444 ATTENDANCE
1800 333 000 CRIMESTOPPERS

     
FIRE   000 EMERGENCY
1300 362 361 BUSHFIRE HOTLINE
     
AMBULANCE    000 EMERGENCY
     
STATE EMERGENCY SERVICES (SES)    132 500 EMERGENCY
     
EMERGENCY ACCOMMODATION    131 611 EMERGENCY
     
BUREAU OF METEOROLOGY   1300 659 215
     
POISONS HOTLINE   131 126
     
NATIONAL SECURITY HOTLINE    1800 123 400

  

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